Koreans Declare Peace

Korean leaders Kim Jong-un and Moon Jae-in met last Friday and declared a historic peace compact between the two countries. While other attempts have been made in the past, this marks the best hope for peace in the Korean Peninsula in 65 years. 

This is hopeful news for everyone around the world. One less place where nuclear war could erupt. 

Despite the investment Americans have made in Korea, both in terms of lives lost and money spent, very little has been made of this effort in the Mainstream Media.

Instead, we have been inundated with the Kavanaugh hearings which have devolved into a partisan inferno of vile attacks on both sides of the political duopoly aisle. 

As a reformed liberal, I left the Democrat Party when they left me. Marching as a child against the Vietnam War, I took comfort in the notion that the Democrat Party was the party of peace. Weary of the endless war policies escalated during George W. Bush's administration, I welcomed the message that Barak Obama carried with him during his election campaign.

I was furious when he doubled down on all the worst things about Bush's warmongering (drone strikes in particular) and walked back his promise to close Guantanamo.

I became a Libertarian because the Libertarian Party has always been the Party of Peace. We have consistently called for the ending of overseas military operations and the closing of overseas bases. There is no reason for American troops to be in Japan or Germany as they have since the end of WWII. As Libertarians, we call for the closing of bases and the return of American troops from Korea as soon as we can.

If you are against endless war for profit and our ever-growing global military presence while maintaining the most powerful defensive military in the world, consider joining us.

Early voting is only 17 days away and the deadline to register to vote is upon us.

Click here to register to vote online. I ask you to consider joining us, the party of peace, by registering or changing your party affiliation today.

Together you and I can make this world a more peaceful place.

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Robert 'Vegas Don' Strawder is The Man

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Robert Strawder, known to thousands by his hip hop name 'Tha Vegas Don', quite simply is the man.  For starters, the hip hop artist and guerrilla filmmaker entered his indie film Checkmate to the Silver State Film Festival in Las Vegas, where he brought home the Audience Award for Best Feature Film.  Robert Strawder is also a member of the hip hop group Digital Underground, and squeezes performances in between making movies and music videos.

 

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Digital Underground's Shock G endorses Robert Strawder

Greg "Shock G" Jacobs, known for being the front man of Digital Underground and a co-producer of several Tupac hits, has endorsed Robert Strawder for U.S. Congress.  Robert "The Vegas Don" Strawder is also a hip hop artist and a fellow member of Digital Underground, and running for House of Representatives on the Libertarian ticket. 

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Julian Assange and the Future of the Free Press

Free Press
I read a piece today on Julian Assange by the always thought-provoking Caitlin Johnstone and came to the conclusion (after following some of the links and thinking hard) that America and the Free World’s Free Press is in a fight for its very existence. The next conclusion I came to was the notion that the only ones who can save our free press are independent journalists.

If you think I’m off my trolly, consider:

  • Donald Trump is fighting anyone in the press or Twittersphere who levels criticism at him or his presidency.
  • Democrats are fighting anyone who is against the FBI and the CIA.
  • Corporate America has transmorphed our Free Press into corporate mainstream media conglomerates who parrot the company line to protect the relationship between the government and the media’s corporate ownership. By being cheerleaders for the establishment they have burned their press cards and become public relations agencies.
  • Julian Assange is about to be kicked out of the Ecuadoran embassy and perp-walked to jail for “leaking” (reporting) things people in power don’t want you to know.

If you think that any of these things are how it should be, they have won.

Many people think Julian Assange is a child rapist and a criminal secret stealer/leaker. Those people would be wrong. The rape narrative is most assuredly a trumped charge foisted upon us by the system that wants him silenced. The system that insists that players in the journalism game play by the rules the system wrote to retain their stranglehold on the throats of the unwashed masses. Anyone paying close attention to Wikileaks knows it’s a clearing-house for information that someone doesn’t want published.

Journalism Is Something Someone Doesn’t Want You To Read

They want Assange silenced for the same reason Lance Gilman wants me silenced; when the people are conned into believing the folks in charge are our benevolent benefactors by the media, those folks in charge can wield power and make money unhindered to the benefit of few at the expense (and on the backs) of the many.

Be it on a national scale or right here in “The Richest Place on Earth”, when the purveyors of information are in the pockets of the “establishment”, we as a society are doomed. When the people are told by information sources they consume that the folks in charge are our benevolent overseers, we are all in deep kimchi.

The Times They Are A-Changin’

In my lifetime I have watched our Free Press undergo such change and transformation that it is unrecognizable from its form a generation ago. Consider just the printed version of the news for a moment. When I opened the doors of The Electric Page in Sacramento in 1986, The Sacramento Bee, was a client located a few blocks away. A powerhouse of free ink founded by James McClatchy in 1857, The Bee had a vast reach and influence in Northern California.

Purchased by Knight Ridder in 2006, The Bee is now part of a vast corporate media empire forced to morph itself something as weak as rooster soup. Caused in part by arrogance and in part by craigslist.org, the ink on paper pillar of the Fourth Estate is today a shadow of its former self. And the Bee is not alone.

The Reno Gazette-Journal recently sold their presses and slenderized into a teeny printed broadsheet printed at the same Swift Media plant where the Carson Appeal is printed. The Carson Appeal announced this month that it would cut it’s print frequency from six days a week to just Wednesday and Saturday. Minden-Gardnerville’s Record-Courier and the Lahontan Tribune are getting slashed as well.

Print papers all over the county are moving to the digital wasteland of the (don’t believe anything you read on the) internet.

While this shift from print to online is happening like it or not, there is another more sinister change underfoot; the existence of a press that maintains a healthy adversarial relationship with the power structure. Without tough questions being asked of our County Leaders or our National Leaders, followed up by tougher ones when they avoid actual answers with babble-speak and mumbo-jumbo, real truth, and facts remain untold. When a pandering sycophantic collection of pathetic grovelers replace real journalists, the gig is up.

Free Speech

For the most part, the free press gig is already up.

“Every time we witness an injustice and do not act, we train our character to be passive in its presence and thereby eventually lose all ability to defend ourselves and those we love.” – Julian Assange

One of my go-to information sources on Tesla was silenced just this week. As the manager of a billion dollar fund, The Montana Skeptic was a vast source of data and insight into the remarkable flimflammery that is Tesla. Maintaining anonymity, Montana was able to distribute insight on Tesla without revealing his identity. Elon Musk called his employer on Monday and on Tuesday Montana deleted his twitter account and vowed to stop writing on Seeking Alpha.

When people like Donald Trump, Elon Musk, and Lance Gilman use their money, power, and influence to quash voices of dissent, we will continue to drift away from the ideals of governance that make The United States the best place to live in the entire planet. When they win, it’s game over, man.

Lucky for us, the game’s not over just yet. As long as people have a chance to read stuff written by courageous keyboard operators, we have a chance. With fearless people like Glenn Greenwald, Nafeez Ahmed, Julia Angwin, Caitlin Johnstone, Julian Assange, and many others keeping it hot and keeping it real, we still have hope.

While my name belongs nowhere near the aforementioned names, I will continue to keep it real in Gold Hill.

Hasta la Victoria, Siempre!

 

Sam Toll is the Communication Director for the Libertarian Party of Nevada

He operates a hyperlocal news site in Gold Hill Nevada called The Storey Teller where this piece first appeared.

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Missives From New Orleans

Libertarian Convention 2018

 

From the Chairman of the Libertarian Party of Nevada

Many of you were following the events of the convention online with facebook, emails, texts and other mediums.  Much of the behind the scenes activity and work were not able to be conveyed efficiently, and I won’t be able to regale you with all of it, but I want you to know what was going on by our state representatives, as well as those we had interactions with from other states.  There is much to be proud of, and this is going to be braggadocious and clearly one sided (mine). There is some benefit to sitting in the chair :)

First off, as James Weeks knows, being a fat guy in a humid climate, clothes are sometimes optional and many times uncomfortable.  I will assure each of you, nobody got naked on stage, but I did have more changes of clothes than most of the “radicals” had costumes.  Most of mine had a collar, and all of them had pants. You can rest assured, our delegation was respectable and professional throughout.  I know this was a wild topic two years ago, and we can all be proud of the decorum showed throughout by most. I also would like to thank CSPAN for not showing up...just in case.  But next time, please trust us again.

 

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But What about Your Fiduciary Duty?

But What about Your Fiduciary Duty?

When Ron was a Nevada higher education regent, his board met one time at Lake Tahoe for a retreat.  An interesting development there yielded an important insight.

Public bodies occasionally hold such events, in which there are no business items on the agenda.  They do so to build relationships among board members, staff and some stakeholders, in this case faculty and staff in universities and colleges.  Usually, they’re held in bucolic or otherwise pleasant settings to promote congeniality.

It all sounds very good: building bridges, esprit, morale, understanding – even solidarity.  Folks can share insight, air differences and come to see each other’s viewpoint in comfortable informal non-threatening give-and-take sessions.  Without any formal business to consider, they don’t have to keep minutes, record votes, etc. and can thus talk with candor, not restraint.

Some sessions are led by a “facilitator”, generally a leader in the field from another town or state. Typically, they are provided by a professional association and trained in leading such groups.  Facilitators reflect the orthodox viewpoints of the association that provides them and thus of the stakeholders the associations represent.

One Lake Tahoe session was led by a former state college president, a woman who had a long career in higher education, especially in administration.  The key moment came in a discussion when she suggested that regents (and other officials on governing boards) have a duty to line up behind a board decision once a vote is taken and not continue to press their dissenting views when they lose a vote.  Once a policy or other decision is determined, she said, everyone should get on board and sell it to the public.

Ron disagreed.  He noted he had made rigorous arguments against the funding formula the board had adopted that was illogical and unfair to community colleges.  Because most regents were advocates for the two universities, no one had even tried to answer his arguments on the merits.  They had no answers for the correct points he raised.  Instead, they used the brute force of a self-interested majority to adopt the flawed formula.

Ron said he would have no integrity in arguing for what had become the company line when he had made compelling arguments against it that had gone unanswered.  So, he would continue to make his points not because he represented a district with a community college, but because the position was right and in the broad public interest.

Ultimately, the exasperated facilitator shrieked, “But what about your fiduciary duty?” It was a tyranny-of-words gambit intended to make the dissenter meekly shut up.  And the chancellor said it was time to move the discussion to the next topic.

Ironically, the facilitator had asked exactly the right question, but Ron didn’t get to explain why her implication was wrong.  The ultimate issue was, indeed, an official’s fiduciary duty.  But the key question was: To whom is the fiduciary duty owed?  Many stakeholders – i.e., special interests – want public officials to represent them and advocate their interests.

In their view, regents should carry the water for faculty, staff and students.  For K-12 and many other matters, this degenerates to: “Do it for the children!!”  Which really means for the adults.

But however sweet that proposition might sound to so-called stakeholders, regents are the governing board of higher education, not advocates for those special interests.  Regents (and other public officials) are elected by voters to represent the people and the broad public interest, so their fiduciary duty is owed to the voters, taxpayers (who pay the bill) and public interest.

Decades ago, the term “stakeholders” was invented as part of public choice theory to explain interest groups in politics and forces to which decision-makers respond.  Over time, special-interest advocates argued for selfish reasons that stakeholders should be treated on a par with the people, voters, taxpayers and broad public interest.

That is the ultimate corruption of politics and governance because it’s how special interests prey upon the broad public interest.  And it is the bastardization of sound theory.

All bodies, public and private, are vulnerable to such go-along-to-get-along non-logic, and many fall for it, especially in education, legislatures and big business.  That’s the problem, not the solution.

Ron Knecht is Nevada Controller.  James Smack is Deputy Controller.

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2020 Libertarian Presidential Candidates

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American politics is a circus. We're still 2 and a half years out from the 2020 general election, but LP Nevada brings you the early scoop on the 2020 Libertarian presidential candidates.

The huge difference between Candidate Trump’s campaign promises and President Trump’s executive actions will be a blessing for America’s third largest political party. Libertarians, Democrats, countless independents, and a numberless minority of Never Trump Republicans already can’t wait to replace the President and his Cabinet of Breitbart correspondents. As of March 2018, these are the likely contenders for the Libertarian Party’s nomination for President in 2020.

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John Calvin Coolidge Jr. - The Early Years

 

John Calvin Coolidge Jr., our 30th President, 1923-1929, was perhaps America’s most under-rated chief executive.  He was a man of few words, decisive action and a dry sense of humor.

“Silent Cal” was born on the Fourth of July in 1872 in Vermont, the son of a prominent local farmer, general store owner, postmaster and politician.  He was the only president born on Independence Day, although three former presidents died on the Fourth.

His father, John Sr., served as a justice of the peace and Vermont legislator.  His mother and only sibling both died by the time Coolidge was 15, but his father lived past 80.

Coolidge moved to Massachusetts, where he spent his pre-presidential years, when he enrolled at Amherst College.  His early career was spent in the Pioneer Valley on the Connecticut River, apprenticing at a Northampton law firm to avoid the cost of law school.  His political activities began there too.

Unlike today, the Republican Party was the dominant party in Massachusetts politics at that time.  Coolidge started his political career campaigning for Republican William McKinley for president in 1896, and caught the attention of the local Republican committee in the process.  Two years later, he was elected to the Northampton city council, and subsequently two terms as city solicitor (city attorney).

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Libertarian Party of Nevada (LPN) Shocks State Politics With Candidates for Governor, Congress

For immediate release…

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Las Vegas, Nevada (Monday, March 5, 2018) - On March 3rd, 2018, at the Alexis Park Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada, the Libertarian Party of Nevada (LPN) nominated candidates for partisan public office. These candidates include Jared Lord for Governor, Timothy Hagan for US Senate, Robert Strawder for CD1, Steven Brown for CD3, and Gregg Luckner for CD4.

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Higher Education, Political Correctness and Free Speech

Last August 9, law professors Amy Wax and Larry Alexander published an article, “Paying the Price for the Breakdown of the Country’s Bourgeois Culture,” in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

It began:

“Too few Americans are qualified for the jobs available.  Male working-age labor-force participation is at Depression-era low.  Opioid abuse is widespread.  Homicidal violence plagues inner cities.  Almost half of all children are born out of wedlock, and even more are raised by single mothers.  Many college students lack basic skills, and high school students rank below those from two dozen other countries.”

To most folks, that’s a straightforward a list of some ills now affecting American society.  In academe, it’s not politically correct and it may offend.

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